State Parks on the Natchez Trace

 

 

 

Boscoe will fish in any body of water.

Boscoe will fish in any body of water.

 

Just to remind you, this trip took place way back in April on our way home to Canada from Texas. Natchez State Park, mile 10 on The Trace just north of Natchez, Mississippi, a long drive off the main road with few signs to direct you. The office was at the end of the road (probably 10 miles) and when we arrived just after noon on a Monday there was a line of RVs waiting for someone to come and open up to check us in.  They were seriously understaffed. Had our lunch by the lake, while we waited for two hours.

 

What's for lunch?

What’s for lunch?

Got our site assigned and proceeded back down the hilly, twisty, windy road to the camping area to find someone parked in our site. So back we went to the office to catch the ranger as he was leaving for parts unknown. He evicted the squatters (who had gotten tired of waiting at the office and had just gone and set up camp) and we finally got installed. Of course, by then a storm front had come through and we had to set up in the rain. Not my favorite campground, sites were small and close together, though we did stay 5 nights to take in the sights of Natchez

 

Primitive trails throughout the park.

Primitive trails throughout the park.

About 15 miles west of Tupelo MS Trace State Park is nestled in the forest and sits on a nice lake. Stayed there only one night four years ago on our way south and always regretted not staying longer, so on this trip we planned a longer visit. It was Easter weekend so we made reservations for a lakeside site.

Our rig camped by the lake.

Our rig camped by the lake.

The other side of the lake.

The other side of the lake.

Boaters on the lake.

Boaters on the lake.

 

The weather was perfect and we had lots of quiet time to prepare for the final push north. We even had a campfire!

The only campfire we had all winter.

The only campfire we had all winter.

Again, the roads in were awful, pot holes big enough to consume a small camper van. Before we left on Monday after Easter Sunday for the serious trip to the cold and rainy north we had to find a vet for Boscoe who was suffering from an ear infection he got from all that ocean swimming at Mustang Island.

Boscoe fishes

Boscoe fishes, no wonder he got an ear infection.

The fish

The fish he never caught.

 

Last post I mentioned that sometimes you have to go miles off the Highway to stay at a state park but in Tennessee,according to the map there was one right on I40 heading towards Nashville from Jackson Mississippi. GPS agreed so we made that our destination for a one night stay. Well, they were right and they were wrong.  Just off the highway was the offices for Natchez Trace State Park. Just the office. We drove 11 miles in on twisting, winding roads through the forest to the turn for the camping area which was only another 8 miles in. Granted the campsites were large pull thrus overlooking the lake, quite beautiful, but we were tired and hungry and the thought of doing that drive in reverse in the morning didn’t appeal. Never the less we enjoyed our stay, sharing our spot with hummingbirds that buzzed us as we ate our dinner outside at the picnic table. (That would be the last time we could eat outside for several weeks because it definitely got too cold as we headed further north.) Bluebirds hung out near us , a thrill for me as they are rare in our part of Southern Ontario.

Seating by the lake.

Seating by the lake.

 

State parks are some of America’s great treasures. We’ve stayed in a lot of them in the past five years and hope to find a great many more in our future travels.

Time now for staying in Walmart parking lots and truck stops because northern campgrounds won’t be open until mid May.

Lake view

Lake view

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2 comments on “State Parks on the Natchez Trace”

  1. How I’d love to get in a campervan and drive through America ! We just don’t have the vastness that your part of the world has, it must be a wonderful experience 🙂 Love hearing about it.


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